structure of Pindar"s epinician odes
Read Online
Share

structure of Pindar"s epinician odes by Carola Greengard

  • 870 Want to read
  • ·
  • 88 Currently reading

Published by Hakkert in Amsterdam .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Greece

Subjects:

  • Pindar -- Technique.,
  • Laudatory poetry, Greek -- History and criticism.,
  • Athletics in literature.,
  • Games in literature.,
  • Rhetoric, Ancient.,
  • Greece -- In literature.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementCarola Greengard.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPA4276 .G7
The Physical Object
Pagination135 p. ;
Number of Pages135
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3821919M
ISBN 109025608728
LC Control Number81131549

Download structure of Pindar"s epinician odes

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Pindar employed the triadic structure attributed to Stesichorus (7th and 6th centuries bc), consisting of a strophe (two or more lines repeated as a unit) followed by a metrically harmonious antistrophe, concluding with a summary line (called an epode) in a different metre. Like all Pindaric odes, “Olympic Ode 1″, which runs to almost lines, is composed in a series of triads, each consisting of strophe, antistrophe and epode, with the strophes and antistrophes having the same metrical pattern, and with the concluding epodes of each triad having a different metre but corresponding metrically with each s:   Pindar's Epinician Odes—choral songs extolling victories in the Games at Olympia, Delphi, Nemea and Korinth—cover the whole spectrum of the Greek moral order, from earthly competition to fate and mythology. But in C. M. Bowra's clear translation his one central image stands out—the successful athlete transformed and transfigured by the /5(8). William H. Race now brings us, in two volumes, a new edition and translation of the four books of victory odes, along with surviving fragments of Pindar's other poems. Like Simonides and Bacchylides, Pindar wrote elaborate odes in honor of prize-winning athletes .

Pindar was one of the most famous ancient Greek lyric poets, and perhaps the best known of the canonical nine lyric poets of ancient Greece. He was regarded in antiquity as the greatest of Greek poets and the esteem of the ancients may help explain why a good portion of his work was carefully preserved (most of the other Greek lyric poems come down to us only in fragments, but nearly a quarter. Thorough knowledge of a selection of Pindaric and Bacchylidean lyric odes, together with the ability to explain grammatical, syntactical and literary aspects of these complex texts. Knowledge of the formal features of epinician poetry, including the Doric dialect of epinician lyric. The great majority of the odes are triadic in structure – i.e., stanzas are grouped together in three's as a lyrical unit. Each triad comprises two stanzas identical in length and meter (called 'strophe' and 'antistrophe') and a third stanza (called an 'epode'), differing in length and meter but rounding off the lyrical movement in some way. Epinicion, Greek epinikion, also spelled epinician, plural epinicia or epinikia, lyric ode honouring a victor in one of the great Hellenic games. The epinicion was performed usually by a chorus, or on occasion by a solo singer, as part of the celebration on the victor’s triumphal return to his city; alternatively, a less elaborate form was offered on the site of his triumph immediately after.

"Pindar's Eyes' is a ground-breaking interdisciplinary exploration of the interactions between Greek lyric poetry and visual and material culture in the early fifth century BCE. It draws on case studies of classical art and texts to open up analysis of the genre to the wider theme of aesthetic experience in early classical Greece, with particular focus on the poetic mechanisms through which. Pindar's Library is the first volume to explore how readers during the Hellenistic period encountered Pindar's poetry in book form, analysing in detail the role played by Pindar's literary, cultic, and scholarly reception in affecting readers' engagement with his epinician odes. The volume examines the poet's literary devices of encomiastic techniques, mythical narratives, and paraenetic. An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Software. An illustration of two photographs. Full text of "The Odes Of Pindar". Pindar's Epinician Odes - choral songs extolling victories in the Games at Olympia, Delphi, Nemea and Korinth - cover the whole sp Pindar's Epinician Odes - choral songs extolling victories in the Games at Olympia, Delphi, Nemea and Korinth - cover the whole spectrum of the Greek moral order, from earthly competition to fate and mythology/5(55).